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    Insight

    One Step Beyond: Download the full landmark conference report

    When The Buyer came together with Sophie Jump to organise and hold the inaugural One Step Beyond Conference in early March the focus was 100% on analysing the most disruptive changes in consumer behaviour and technology. Little did we know that just over two months on so many of those changes have now been put on fast forward because of the Covid-19 outbreak. Here is the full report from what was a breakthrough conference for the drinks, retail and hospitality sectors. A day that brought experts from outside the industry’s comfort zone and gave them the platform to set out what we can all expect from consumers and technology in the future. Predictions that are already being seen in how fast businesses and consumers alike are responding to the challenges of Covid-19.

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    Insight

    The Buyer’s Case: Top buyers put Boisset FGV wines to the test

    The hardest job for any wine producer, no matter how prestigious or respected, is getting their wines in front of the right buyers who can ultimately make the difference in getting their wines on to the lists of the restaurants and bars that really matter. That’s what The Buyer’s Case project does. Link producers looking to build distribution in the premium on-trade and specialist retail sector with key buyers in those channels. Here’s how major French producer, Boisset FGV worked with The Buyer on its own Buyer’s Case initiative.

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    Insight

    California Buyers Trip Part 2: the wines and styles ready to export

    Having the opportunity to go to California and meet over 100 producers in an intense five days of tasting doesn’t come around too often. But it proved to be an invaluable exercise for the group of leading wine buyers from both the UK and Irish on and off-trade markets. In Part One of our report we looked at their general feedback on why they wanted to go on such a trip. Here in Part Two we drill down into what they really thought of the wines and the opportunities of giving them a chance in the markets over here.

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    Insight

    California looks to bring right producers & buyers together

    If you are a wine buyer for a leading importer, restaurant group, or independent merchant then there are times of the year when you are no doubt spoilt for choice with invitations to go and visit different regions and countries. But which are ones are going to be the most useful, effective and important to your buying needs? It’s what made the recent California Wine Institute event for leading UK and Irish buyers so different. And relevant. Rather than take a group of buyers on a bus around a select group of producers, the Institute brought the producers to the buyers for a series of back to back tastings hosted in the same venue. It meant the busy buyers were able to see over 100 wineries across five days of intensive tasting and take a deep dive into the kind of wines being made across the state. What’s more the producers did not currently have distribution in the UK or Ireland, or both, and had to have wines, with volume, that could the hit the main commercial to mid premium price points. The Buyer’s Richard Siddle, who helped to identify and recruit some of the buyers invited, was also there to get an insider’s take on how it all came together.

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    Opinion

    South Africa Restaurant Safari – 9 buyers, 18 wineries, 2 Land Rovers

    Here’s a conundrum for you. How do you get nine of the UK’s leading wine buyers to meet 18 winemakers in four restaurants in different parts of London in under five hours? Well, throw two Land Rovers into the mix and you are half way home. It’s certainly how The Buyer teamed up with Wines of South Africa to take a group of top buyers on a tour of London restaurants, and the chance to meet some of South Africa’s best winemakers at the same time. Eating, tasting, chatting along the way. Buckle up and join us on the ride…

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    Insight

    Buyer French Debate: Rise of Crémant & other sparkling wines

    In part one of The Buyer’s debate, alongside Business France, between leading importers, merchants, restaurants and wine producers from most regions of France, we focused on the rise in and importance of organic wines. The tasting and discussion also looked at how different styles of sparkling wine are now really coming to the fore, and how Crémant, in particular, is presenting a real premium alternative, ideal for promoting and driving in the premium on-trade.

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    Insight

    Buyer Debate: the opportunity for French organic wine

    For the latest The Buyer Debate we teamed up with Business France to bring producers from different regions of France together with key buyers from across the premium on-trade to look at two key growth areas not only for French wine, but the premium wine category as a whole: organics and sparkling wine. It was an opportunity to meet, taste the wines and then explore why French winemakers are increasingly turning to organics and sparkling wine production. Whilst assessing just what it is leading UK wine distributors, merchants and restaurant and bar owners are looking for when taking on a new French wine supplier. There was a lot to cover. So much so that we have broken down the report into two parts. First up we look at the rise in organics and both the opportunities and the challenges there are in making and selling organic wine.

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    Insight

    Behind the scenes on The Buyer’s Vouvray Restaurant Tour

    It’s one thing tasting wine professionally it is quite another to go on an eating and tasting tour of top London restaurants to experience food and wine in the same way your customers do. Which is what The Buyer’s most recent restaurant tour was all about as we were able to introduce different styles of Vouvray wine to a tour of buyers covering wine merchants, sommeliers, importers, consultants and journalists. As we publish our full report from the event, Richard Siddle picks out the highlights.

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    Insight

    Buyer debate: Indies put Ribera del Duero through its paces

    Even for a wine region that is as relatively small as Spain’s Ribera del Duero it’s important to taste as many wines as possible if you are going to truly understand, experience and enjoy its enormous diversity, says wine writer and critic, Tim Atkin MW. To help do just that, but also debate and share what leading UK buyers think of Ribera del Duero, The Buyer teamed up with the region’s generic body, a panel of top wine merchants and Atkin himself to see what opportunities there are in the burgeoning independent retail and wholesale sector.

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    Insight

    Douro’s Soul Wines Debate: why the wines are ideal for the UK

    “There is a deliciousness to these red wines. I am hugely impressed by them. The quality has blown me away.” Just the kind of review any wine producer would want for their wines, particularly if it comes from such as senior a figure as John Graves, on-trade channel director at Bibendum Wine. But Graves was not the only UK panelist in our debate with the Douro Valley’s Soul Wine producers to be impressed with what they saw and tasted. In part two of our report on the wide ranging debate we assess the opportunity for Douro’s wines in the premium on-trade and what steps producers need to take to make the most of them.

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    People People: On-Trade

    Sommeliers on Chile: The Buyer & Chono Wines debate

    To try to unravel and understand Chile’s position in the premium on-trade, The Buyer teamed up with Ellis Wines and its Chilean producer partner, Chono Wines, to bring
    together a group of senior wine trade professionals, buyers and sommeliers to debate what are the opportunities and challenges for Chile as a whole. It was the chance for these leading figures to share their experiences with Chilean wines in their restaurants and businesses and look at the kinds of wines from Chile that they are looking to source and select for their wine lists.

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    Insight

    Mionetto and The Buyer Prosecco study tour and report

    Is there a more misunderstood wine category than Prosecco? It might top all the best selling charts, but it is too often dismissed or taken seriously by some professional wine buyers. To help get to know not only the beautiful region of Conegliano Valdobbiadene, but to explore the different quality tiers of Prosecco and the potential they have in the premium on-trade, The Buyer teamed up with leading Prosecco brand, Mionetto, and its UK partner Copestick Murray, to host a study tour with key buyers and influencers of the area and the city where Prosecco truly comes to life – Venice.

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    Insight

    Jackson Family debate on Californian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir

    It’s nice talking about and throwing the spotlight on new wine regions and emerging styles of wine and little known grape varieties, but at these times of the year restaurant and bar customers are looking for the classics and the tried and tested. Which is why for our latest major debate we teamed up with Jackson Family Wines to look at what leading wine buyers, sommeliers, distributors and merchants think about Californian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

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    Insight

    Special Report: Sonoma County Vintners London Wine Bar Tour

    Organising a wine tasting where all your guests are sitting in one place can prove to be a challenge at times, so you can imagine the potential for things to wrong if you then invited those guests to go on a tour of restaurants and bars around London, tasting different wines, matched to each outlet’s food along the way. It certainly made for a very different, fun, highly informative and memorable day for wineries from Sonoma County Vintners and our panel of “tour-ists” willing to go on the adventure with us.

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    Insight

    Closures Debate: what do you want to put in a bottle of wine?

    Outside of the natural wine debate is there a more contentious issue than the one that surrounds the type of closure you have in your bottle of wine? To assess what leading on-trade buyers and sommeliers now think about closures we teamed up with Vinventions, one of the biggest suppliers of all types of closure from cork to screwcap, to make the issue of closures the latest topic in our Buyer Debate series.

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    Insight

    The Buyer’s Case with Castelnau Wine Agencies

    Every wine as soon as it is made puts its self up for judgement. Be it the end consumer who wants to drink it with their dinner, or the trade buyers and wine critics looking to score, assess and adjudicate on whether it is suitable for listing in the first place. But nothing ventured, nothing gained and Castelnau Wine Agencies was happy to put its range of wines from producers all over the world up to the test in our latest Buyer’s Case project with leading on-trade buyers and influencers in the trade.

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    Tasting Tasting: Panel Tasting

    The Buyer’s Case with Cave de Vignerons de Saint-Chinian wines

    The Buyer has been set up to help drinks producers and leading on-trade buyers better understand their needs and where possible work closer together. This is best demonstrated by The Buyer’s Case initiative where we link up with a wine producer or importer and ask leading buyers to taste, assess and offer professional feedback on their wines. Here we turn to the Languedoc-Roussillon and present wines from leading producer, Cave de Vignerons de Saint-Chinian to leading on-trade decision makers.

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    Opinion

    The French debate: putting France under the spotlight with Foncalieu

    France might be the best selling country in the UK on-trade, but that does not mean it could not sell. To help better understand the opportunities and challenges facing French wine in the premium on-trade, The Buyer linked up with Les Vignobles Foncalieu and leading buyers from the different types of operator, including high end restaurants, independent wine merchants and national wholesalers all working the French category in the north west of the country.

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    Insight Tasting Tasting: Panel Tasting

    New Zealand Debate: the opportunities and challenges

    New Zealand’s enormous success in the UK off-trade, where its Sauvignon Blanc has created a category of its own, has not always been reflected in how many of its wines are on premium on-trade wine lists. The Buyer teamed up with Villa Maria, and its UK partners, Hatch Mansfield, to ask a panel of leading UK buyers to set out the challenges and opportunities for New Zealand in the premium on-trade

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    Insight Tasting Tasting: Panel Tasting

    The Buyer’s Case with Les Vignerons Foncalieu

    The Buyer’s Case is a new initiative that gives producers the chance to show specific drinks to key buyers in target channels of the on-trade. For our first Buyer’s Case we teamed up with Les Vignerons Foncalieu and selected key buyers in its main distribution areas in the UK on-trade to show their wines. Here are the results.

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    Insight Tasting Tasting: Panel Tasting

    Virginia Wine Project: bringing producers and buyers together

    The Buyer teamed up with Virginia Wine and some of its key producers to help them better understand the needs of the UK premium on-trade and how buyers might relate to their wines with both a business roundtable debate with key players and a study tour of leading London restaurants, wine bars and merchants to see the kind of offers they have and where their wines might fit in.

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    Instataste

    Tasting with pictures View All
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    • Pernand-Vergelesses is one of Bourgogne’s lesser known appellations – surprising really given that, as a commune , it houses three Grands Crus including Corton-Charlemagne and Corton. It is tucked into the junction of two valleys in the Côte de Beaune wine region and consists of mainly South and East-facing slopes. The wines here are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay roughly 50/50 in quantity. The French also know Pernand for its long cultural history, particularly with the theatre. This red is typical Pernand-Vergelesses, it comes from one of eight Premier Cru sites in the appellation and represents excellent value for money. To look at the wine is medium ruby; the nose is intense and pretty at the same time, seductive aromas mingle of blue plum, cranberry, spices and a distinct orange peel note; there’s a lovely fresh entry which becomes more intense and muscular in the mid-palate, which is followed a dry
    • A brand new wine from the iconic  @louislatouruk  stable which is good and earthy and will be lapped up by those who like their Bourgogne reds nice and rustic. Fixin is in the North in the Côte de Nuits, it has just shy of 100 hectares, 95% of which are Pinot Noir. Its wines are referred to as ‘Winter wines’ as they tend to need more time in the bottle. To look at this wine is deep-mid ruby; the nose is typical Fixin with notes of animal scents, musk and pepper amongst the black cherry and blackcurrant fruit, some peony flowers too; the palate is medium-weight with firm, finely textured tannins, not overly complex in the mouth but fresh and finely registered, nicely rounded dry finish. It wouldn’t be right to call Fixin a pretty wine but this is remarkably approachable in its youth. A welcome addition to Latour’s range.
    • Savigny-Lès-Beaune is a village in the winegrowing region of La Côte de Beaune, that lies between the hills of Corton and Beaune. The appellation has a good deal of history – these vineyards used to be owned by the Dukes of Bourgogne; red vines outnumber whites 10-1, with a third being premier cru. Bouchard owns almost 4 hectares of Savigny premier cru including this ‘climat’ so named because of the big flat stones or ‘laves’ in the area. To look at the wine is deep cherry red; the nose has an overwhelming bouquet of red and black berry fruit with fresh violets and a hint of cloves; the palate is ample with layers of red and black fruit (morello cherry) and robust but well integrated, chalky tannins. The wine has great presence and length, ripe with a nice spicy kick. Needs a few years to age but the beauty of
    • One of Bourgogne’s lesser-known appellations, Rully is located in the Côte Chalonnaise in the south of the Côte de Beaune; there are 320 hectares of vines, a third of which are red and a third of which are premier cru, accounted for by 23 premier cru climats, of which Clos du Chapitre is one. The wine is hugely impressive, an elegant gem which punches way above its weight and price point. Pale ruby; quite a shy nose at this early stage of its life – hints of red cherry, black rose petals; medium weight in the mouth, lithe and liquid entry, precise and elegant red fruit flavours, melting tannins already so well integrated, lovely balance between the reasonably firm structure and pretty fruit. Clearly will benefit from some ageing but can just as easily be drunk now. Winemaker Hélène Jaeger-Defaix took over the vineyards in 2002, her great-grandfather was well
    • If you’re looking for an approachable white Bourgogne with a lot of class and good value for money this fits the bill. Because of the hot 2019 summer, the fruit here had good ripeness and concentration, however because the 6 hectare plot close to Pouilly-Fuissé, and located on the Mont de Maconnais that Drouhin buys fruit from is elevated, and the house also picks the fruit early, there is a lovely freshness and acidity in the wine that keeps good balance. So it has the ample mouthfeel and big flavours that are characteristic of this southerly region of Bourgogne, but is not too ‘big’. To look at, the wine is very light shiny gold; there are notes of white flowers, a bit of rich stone fruit coming in there – white peach – and also quite grapey. Medium weight palate with concentrated fruit flavours, really flavoursome. This is easy-drinking, approachable,
    • It was in 1924 that the village of Auxey joined with the name of its best parcel of vines ‘Les Duresses’ and became Auxey-Duresses. Three quarters of the appellation’s output are red wines, and its prestigious neighbours Volnay and Pommard totally red, so this white can be overlooked, which would be a big mistake. It is fresh, nicely structured, elegant and refined and beautifully balanced in this 2019 vintage. The wine spends 8-10 months in oak barrels 10% new, medium toasted. On the eye it is light shiny yellow-gold; quite a complex and savoury nose, nutty (fresh almonds), a wisp of smoke, a lick of vanilla oak and a touch of gingerbread. Light-medium weight, fresh attack, really textural, grainy mouthfeel, nice precision, freshly-squeezed citrus, little bit of white pepper heat on the finish. Gastronomic white – really great with food. The 2019 vintage is being celebrated in  #BourgogneWeek  - more
    • From the new 2019 vintage. The Michel family has been making wine in Chablis since the mid-Nineteenth century and makes 13 different Chablis from three grand crus to this entry level Petit Chablis. Contrary to some popular held belief Petit Chablis is not ‘lesser’ Chablis, it refers to Chablis that is made from vines planted on the top of the hills and exposed slopes – it tends to be less complex good for earlier drinking, and is usually the cheapest level of Chablis. Michel’s vineyards are planted on very stony limestone-based soils. Michel likes to use indigenous yeast and vinify and age in stainless steel to keep the distinctiveness of the terroir as much as possible To drink, this is pure and clean; on the nose you get notes of lime, flint and oystershell. There is a light mouthfeel with a nice balance between ripe apples, lemon rind, and more
    • Since he started making wine here in 1999 Damien Laureau has been regarded as one of the rising stars of the region. Well-established now with a huge reputation, although his production output is still limited. He is one of a handful of producers in Savennières picking the fruit a little riper and using less sulphur in order to produce wine that can be drunk earlier than you would normally associate with Savennières,(that often need a least 5 or 6 years to soften up). As a region Savennières has been on the up expanding from 46 hectares in the 1970s to around 150 hectares today, the vines here are on sandier soil. The wine is very light gold; there are notes of ripe quince, honeysuckle, white peach ; the palate is super tense, very fresh with real energy, the central vein of acidity is apparent but balanced well with the ripeness
    • This is only the second vintage of the Argentinian ‘First Growth’ from winemaker Fernando Buscema, and a fascinating contrast with the 2016. Although it needs maybe 4-5 more years it is already more open with more heft than ‘16 – but with a similar blend of Cabernet Sauvignon 59% and Malbec 33% and Buscema deciding to retain the Cabernet Franc he introduced to the blend in ‘16. Spring frosts brought on by drier and slightly cooler weather resulted in lower yields, an early harvest and a beautiful balance in the wine. To look at - the wine is deep inky purple, almost opaque. The nose is ripe, more complex at this stage than the ‘16, cassis and blackberries to the fore, earthy, with a touch of lifted eucalyptus, and a leafy element. In the mouth it is dense, medium-heavyweight, layers of black fruit, firm but ripe tannins, which are amazingly
    • 2nd bottle opened from a case of 2014 and really starting to click, after a couple of hours in the decanter. It’s the contrast – between the richness and intensity of the mid-palate fruit with the crushed rock, spine of acidity that adds finesse and freshness – that is so thrilling. Hallmark Northern Rhône aromas of dense black fruit, pepper, violets, a touch of feral; the palate is equally complex with roasted meat juices, game, tapenade, crushed rocks. The wine is structured but open with rounded tannins at the same time, terrific backbone. Drink now or cellar for a decade at least. Joyous.
    • Ripe, golden, barrel-aged Chenin Blanc that is rounded, luscious, almost voluptuous, and yet has a sturdy foundation of acidity that carries the weight of the wine and balances it so well. The Cady family has owned this St Aubin de Luigné vineyard since 1927 with current winemaker Alexandre recently taking over from his father Philippe. The wine is aged in 225 litre barrels for 11 months, but the wood is only detectable in the colour, structure and texture of the wine. On the nose the wine is grapey, honeyed with a touch of wild herbs (fennel) ; the palate is mid-weight, ripe but terrifically poised, lemony zest mixed with mango and honey on butter, slightly bitter twist on the finish, which you come to expect of Chenin Blanc. Widely available for £13.99 which is nuts value.
    • The latest in Hine’s Bonneuil series continues with this new bottling of the 2010 vintage. The series is a single vintage, single vineyard Cognac with the fruit sourced from the 70 hectares around the Bonneuil estate. 2010 was a very good vintage for many wine regions in France and the Ugni Blanc in Cognac benefitted particularly from the glorious sunshine in August and September but, most importantly, the high diurnal range that importantly helps keep the high acidity in the wines, helps produce fatty acids in the eau de vie and delivers concentration of the aromas. Lighter in colour than the previous three Bonneuil releases (2005, 2006 and 2008); there is a lot of power in the nose, which is translated to tension, liveliness and freshness in the spirit which has a smoothness and then an enormous length – classic but still notable for such a young Cognac. There is
    • An example of how impressive a crémant can be when put in the right hands. Winemaker Marielle Henron spent 15 years as the winemaker at Bollinger and also worked at Pommery before setting up her own estate at Château de l’Aulée in the Loire – the second largest region in France for sparkling. The wine has been aged on its lees for two years and, just as they do at Bollinger, Marielle adds a dosage of older vintage, barrel-matured wine to lend subtle, creamy richness. To taste: Vigorous mousse, settles down into fine bead – light gold; the nose is pretty and floral (honeysuckle) with ripe orchard fruit and a nutty complexity which is surprising given this is an NC Crémant; the palate is clipped and precise and there’s a lovely balance between the ripeness of the fruit and a spine of refreshing acidity. There’s great depth to the fruit,
    • A very cool cloud of wonderfully tart but ripe apple flesh rises with the first swirl of the glass. More air then retains that coolness but imbues the nose with saltiness and something akin to oyster shell before the first powdery glimpse of yeastiness appears. Yet, this stays firmly on the taut, statuesque side, doing its Côte des Blancs provenance every honour. The palate is svelte but carries at its heart both autolytic roundness and an intense salty moreishness. These two elements compel each other, drawing us into vivid, chalky depth and giving us just enough emollience to make us sip and search for that salt again. The wine’s echo is of purity and freshness. The mousse is fine, persistent and lively, this is fresh-faced, tight and lovely now – but it has the structure and poise to still shine in a decade’s time. The only hint of evolution so
    • Where many English still wines struggle with ripeness this excellent pure Chardonnay manages it with ease, pulling off a rounded edge to wine that still has a steely core. Fermented in steel and wood, it has undergone malolactic and then aged further in wood. Very light gold on the eye; elegant, slightly savoury nose with a touch of gunflint; light bodied, fresh, with an attractive blend of orchard and stone fruit, that blends into a limey, cleansing wash, with bright acidity and a long, dry, tingly finish, little hints of tropical fruit along the way. Great food wine – we drank it with lobster mac ‘n’ cheese but would work well with terrines, white meats and all manner of seafood. You can find the 2018 and 16 on the market but this hasn’t been released yet (the winemakers wanted to give it more age), one to buy when it does.
    • Established in the Nineteenth century, Bertani has a long, illustrious history. This classic Valpolicella Ripasso is a blend of 85% Corvina with Merlot and Rondinella, ‘Ripasso’ meaning that the wine undergoes a second fermentation in March on the skins of the Amarone grapes that are still slightly sweet. The wine is then matured for a year in 75 hectolitre barrels, for a year in concrete vats and then six months in bottle before release. Very light, see-through ruby red; elegant, enticing nose of red cherry, dark chocolate, kirsch, tobacco and white pepper; Medium weight on the palate and richer than you might expect from the light colour, the wine is fresh, tense, with silky tannins, and a long persistent finish, a nice balance and interesting juxtaposition between ripe red cherry and high acidity.
    • Beaujolais doesn’t get much better than this fresh and pure expression of old vine Gamay grown in a 4ha monopole vineyard on crystalline granitic soils. Although vigneron Mathieu Mélinand has been one of the new faces of Beaujolais for the past 12 years since he took over the estate from his father, his winemaking is all about tradition – hand-picked fruit, 100% whole bunch, carbonic maceration, aged in old barrels for 10-12 months before being bottled unfined and unfiltered. 2018 is a fresh, fruity, ripe vintage in the region leading to a really approachable, crowd-pleaser of a wine. Pale to medium purple; the nose is an intoxicating and heady brew of red rose, black fruits, spice tin; the palate is pure, clearly defined, expressive, firmly structured, with fine-grained ripe tannins. Lovely balance here with the fresh juiciness of the fruit, the core of acidity and the slight citrus grip on
    • Classy new launch from Pommery – a companion to the Apenage Blanc de Blancs it launched in 2019. It’s a blend of its red grapes – Pinot Noir bringing finesse and elegance and Meunier adding a lovely roundness. It has Wintertime in its title which is appropriate, especially for this time of year; where the BdB was bright and structured, this is more rounded and comforting – great as an aperitif or with various foods, also a fine way to see the back of 2020. On the eye it is light-medium gold, fine lazy bead; the nose is attractive, lightly floral, fruit ranging from red berry, to red apple, a touch of biscuit and vanilla custard; the attack is precise and fresh, the wine softening on the mid palate with honey, pear, red berries. There is a nice, pure mineral texture, terrific balance. £42 RRP
    • 2018 vintage. Quite dark in colour, it is already a delight to drink for, notwithstanding its power, it has fine, sensuous and beautifully integrated tannins that melt in the mouth behind a wall of seductive red and black fruit. Exotic spices, so apparent on the nose, dance on the mid-palate while vivacious freshness helps achieve wonderful harmony to the wine. Structure comes from highly judicious use of new oak (38%), which underwent ‘very very light toasting’ according to Emmanuel Sala, the head winemaker, who has achieved perfect balance in the wine, sitting at 13.6% abv as it does. To conclude, Simone 2018 is refined, complex, rich and ripe, yet exceptionally silky in texture; very long, concentrated and intensely flavoured but at the same time graceful and fresh. Above all, it has a feeling of being absolutely natural, a reflection perhaps of Chateau de Pommard’s biodynamically-farmed vineyards. Multi-layered, its finish lingers
    • First vintage of this new super-premium Cabernet Sauvignon from Ningxia, that is aiming for a fresher, more elegant style of red, than we have come to expect from the region, certainly the tannin structure is far more fine-tuned and velvety. On the eye the wine is medium ruby, almost see-through; the nose has some heat with notes of toasted spice, cedar, pepper, the fruit is a mix of red and black – mulberry – with some dried blackcurrant, a touch of eucalyptus too; On the palate the wine is silky smooth, fluid, medium weight, very pleasant, fresh but with ample structure and a fine streak of rigid acidity. Clearly a wine that is trying to do something different – on the eye the wine doesn’t look like a 100% Cabernet Sauvignon, certainly not such a recent vintage. The nose does pick up a resinous quality from the 100% new French