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    Tuscany
    People People: Supplier
    greencroft cans lots

    Why Greencroft Bottling believes so much of wine’s future is in a can

    We’ve all heard the talk about demand for wines in a can, but now that Greencroft Bottling, one of the UK’s biggest and most influential packing companies in the country has decided to invest over £2 million in installing the UK’s first canning line for wine, all that talk is turning into action. Greencroft has clearly seen and had enough demand from its customers, which stretch from major branded wine companies to the big supermarkets and on-trade groups, to take the step to have a dedicated canning facility. David Kermode looks at the opportunities that lie ahead for canned wine.

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    Insight
    Pol Roger Long Read

    Pol Roger opens the first ‘missing’ bottles from the 1900 cellar collapse

    There are many special tastings in the world of wine and many special bottles – some of them with plenty of bottle age. But the tasting that took place three days ago in Epernay was in the realm of ‘I was there’. 119 years after its cellars collapsed Champagne Pol Roger opened the first two intact bottles it had managed to retrieve from the rubble of the 1900 catastrophe. So what would be inside the bottles? sludge? vinegar? surely not drinkable Champagne? Peter Dean was there to witness the preparation, painstaking disgorgement and taste the two wines, one most likely from 1897, the second from 1895 – the first vintage that was bought by Winston Churchill.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Fizzics

    Let’s Get Fizzical Fizzical – Bibendum and its sparkling-focused Fizzics

    Putting more of a focus into a trade tasting pays dividends, according to Mike Turner who praises the learnings he gleaned from Fizzics – the fourth iteration of a sparkling-focused tasting from Bibendum. Fizzics included: Champagne Palmer’s ‘Does Size Matter?’ (ooh err) focus; hearing about how a group of producers in Spain’s Penedès region have moved away from the Cava label; Ridgeview and sustainability; and Gianluca Bisol’s top Prosecco. Turner soaked it all up – as well as a fair degree of sparkling, it has to be said.

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    Insight
    okanagan wakeboarding

    Jackie Fast on why Canada’s Okanagan is better than Napa Valley

    As someone who was born and grown up in Canada’s Okanagan Valley, Jackie Fast is well placed to have seen how far it has grown and developed as a serious wine region in its own right over the last 20 plus years. As she says she has “watched first” hand to see how the quality of wine and the investment being made in the region has elevated the Okanagan to a level she believes can now give even the illustrious Napa Valley a run for its money.

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    Tasting: Wine
    IMG_2747 Long Read

    Roger Jones recommends the best white wines from Alto Adige

    In this report top chef and Buyer contributing editor Roger Jones explores the white wines of the Alto Adige region with a special focus on Gewürztraminer – so often tasting of ‘granny’s face powder’ but here in the most Northern part of Italy produced in a dry style wine with a delicate fragrance of lychees, crisp Turkish Delight, pink grapefruit, very fine perfume with a lovely fresh acidity. Jones also highlights wineries that had exceptional white wine and those making wines made from unusual varieties such as Solaris.

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    Insight
    sheep new zealand Long Read

    Where next for New Zealand as global demand increases?

    It’s a nice problem to have. Too many people, countries, importers, restaurants and sommeliers want to get more than the fair share of your wines. So how do you juggle who gets what in a situation where you are running out of land to make a lot more wine. That’s the situation that New Zealand now finds itself in as global demand is increasing so fast it is starting to struggle to keep up. Richard Siddle assesses the opportunities and challenges the country faces in the coming years.

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    Opinion
    Sam Coverdale is dedicated to biodynamic farming at Polperro

    James Nathan: How do you source sustainable wine for a list?

    Over the last few weeks The Buyer has been looking at what steps restaurants, wine buyers and sommeliers are taking to make their wine lists more sustainable. Be it the actual wines they are buying, through to the producers they work, the regions they come from. Is it time for the premium on-trade to be taking sustainable wine far more seriously? James Nathan at Pull The Cork certainly thinks so. In fact the business has been set up just to trade in sustainable wine. Here he explains what he means by sustainable wine and offers some advice and tips to buyers on how they might want to adapt how they source wine to put sustainability further up the buying agenda.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Armit Long Read

    How Armit’s tasting went around the world in 80 wines

    Setting aside its considerable range of Italian agencies was a bold move for Armit Wines at last week’s Autumn Portfolio tasting – and it worked, very well indeed. Showing just 80 wines the tasting was focused, showed off Armit’s international estates and also proved how contemporary many of the wines are. With new agencies Terroir Sense Fronteres and Château Maris present; new wines such as La Rioja Alta’s Viña Arana Gran Reserva there; and some interesting curios, this was a tasting where it was hard to overlook the strength and depth of the range. Peter Dean highlights a dozen wines that sommeliers should look out for.

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    Opinion
    Kékfrankos

    Wines of Hungary’s spotlight on Kékfrankos & Blaufränkisch

    One grape many aliases. In fact Kékfrankos or Blaufränkish goes by more names than a secret agent – in Germany it goes by the name Lemberger, in Austria Blaufränkisch, in Hungary Kékfrankos, then Frankovka Modrá, Burgund Mare and Modra Frankinia – the name changing with almost every bend of the Danube as it swings through Central and Eastern Europe. Elizabeth Gabay MW explores why this is one of Europe’s most important grapes and flags up Wines of Hungary’s Blue of the Danube tasting where you can discover first hand the quality and diversity of this ever-changing grape.

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    Insight
    grover zampa

    New and old shine in IWSC’s Southern Hemisphere awards

    The latest round of medals to be released by the International Wine & Spirit Competition shows, once again, just how diverse and wide ranging the event has become with Kenya, Bolivia and India amongst those picking up medals in the Southern Hemisphere part of the competition. Which is very much part of the wider IWSC strategy to open the awards and make it relevant and important to emerging as well as traditional wine producing countries. Here we pick out the highlights from the New World medal winners in the 2019 competition.

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    Insight
    It's harder for Aldi to differentiate its wine offer or even copy the brands as there are so few real household wine brands

    Drinks industry to ‘streamline’ & consolidate buying role

    With mounting pressure across all retail and on-trade groups to be able to manage rising costs better it is not surprising to hear of so many moves to collaborate and consolidate resources. Be it joint alliances to help with buying in non-competing areas, like we see amongst independent merchants and the Vindependents and other wine buying groups across the country, through to much bigger collaborations between multinational retailers and groups. It’s why we are seeing so many bigger, centralised buying functions emerging, like the recent news that Aldi is making wine a key part of its new, enhanced global group buying function. But what does that all mean to the wine fixture and what choice is ultimately available to the end consumer? Richard Siddle delves into the world of “streamline buying” and retailer and brand collaboration that is all meant to help us buy and sell better.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Jenkyn Place

    Anne Krebiehl MW on Jenkyn Place’s first ever Blanc de Blancs

    The summer of 2015 was not spectacular in Hampshire, but it was long and dry and the Chardonnay it produced was out of this world. Anne Krebiehl MW hears first hand from Jenkyn Place’s Camilla Jennings how this led the English winery to make its first ever Blanc de Blancs, under the watchful eye, as always, of consultant winemaker Dermot Sugrue. Jennings explains how the brief was to make a wine that had great elegance but also approachability – being able to be drunk in all manner of situations.

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    People: Producer
    Château Changyu Moser XV

    Is the world ready for a €150 wine from Changyu Moser XV?

    Since acclaimed Austrian winemaker Lenz Moser accepted the role of chief winemaker at Château Changyu Moser XV in 2014, he has developed a range of wines that is sold in 40 markets around the world, including his barrel-fermented white Cabernet Sauvignon that has become the most successful Chinese wine ever, winning three major gold medals in Europe. His latest project is a super-premium Chinese wine to be launched in Marrakech, Morocco next spring, a Cabernet Sauvignon that will cost a hefty €150 a bottle. Louise Hurren caught up with him in Yinchuan and discusses his successes, mistakes and ambitions with bringing Chinese wine to the West.

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    People People: On-Trade
    Andres Rangal From Gymkhana wins Sud de France sommelier of the year

    Gymkhana’s Andrés Rangel wins Sud de France UK Sommelier

    “It is a celebration, a chance for every sommelier at different stages of their career to show their appreciation and knowledge of wines from the Occitanie region”. This is how Sud de France’s executive director, Isabelle Kanaan, describes the challenge of taking part in what was the 10th edition of the Sud de France Sommelier Competition. Richard Siddle was also there not just to report, but act as one of the judges in this prestigious event. He was also in the ideal place to feel the tension, appreciate the talents of the finalists and join in the congratulations to the overall winner, Andrés Rangel, assistant head sommelier at Gymkhana. 

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    People: Producer
    Luberon

    Why the wines of AOC Luberon have got it all going for them

    They’re like buses and policemen… you wait an eternity to hear about a wine from Luberon, as we did with Les Quelles de la Coste, and then a week later everyone’s talking about them. Geoffrey Dean travels to this sunny corner of France made famous by Peter Mayle’s A Year in Provence and discovers why the wines of AOC Luberon have got everything going for them. Dean visits Château La Canorgue, which inspired the film A Good Year and also the domains of two individuals responsible for raising the profile of the area – Fabrice Monod at Château Fontvert and Paul Dubrule at La Cavale.

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    Insight
    vinexpo explorer meetings

    Vinexpo Explorer shows top buyers a rejuvenated Beaujolais

    Beaujolais might appear at first to be a strange choice for Vinexpo to host its third Explorer event, inviting up to 100 buyers from all over the world to discover and explore a wine region that up to now has not had the international focus. But whilst Beaujolais might be so well known, how relevant and important has it been to major international buyers over the last five to 10 years? This was a chance to help them see a new, rejuvenated Beaujolais, with so many new wines and styles to show. David Kermode was there for The Buyer, equally inquisitive to see how this new Beaujolais would perform.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Chile

    Sarah McCleery: Six of the most exciting new wines from Chile

    When a country or wine region is renowned for doing something well, there is often very little motivation to do things differently. The consistent and value-driven wines were out in force at the 2019 Wines of Chile tasting in London last week. There was also a fair smattering of the premium-led wines that have been grabbing headlines of late. But in terms of envelope pushing, for Sarah McCleery, the wines from Loncomilla, La Ronciere and Viña Laurent were the ones that piqued her interest most. Using a range of ancient varietals, vinification formats and techniques these estates are currently pushing the limits of what is possible in the country, both philosophically and geographically.

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    People People: Supplier
    the buyer bellavita panel

    Wine importers to debate best of Italy & Mediterranean at Bellavita

    This month’s Bellavita exhibition gives UK wine buyers the chance to explore and discover wines and food from across Italy and the Mediterranean at an event dedicated to bringing the full restaurant experience together under one roof. So rather than just have an event purely for wine, and another for food, Bellavita is very much about bringing the two sides together. The Buyer will be hoping to do that too as part of a wine trade debate on November 7 that will ask major importers and merchants to assess where Italian and Mediterranean wines are going in the premium on-trade.

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    People People: Producer
    georgia qvevri outside

    Peter Ranscombe: my top tips at Georgian Wine Festival

    Ahead of this month’s Wines of Georgia trade tastings in London (October 2) and Manchester (October 8), Peter Ranscombe highlights six wineries that stood out for him on a visit last week to the former Soviet state. With a two-year waiting list for winemakers wanting to buy the nation’s iconic qvevri clay vessels for fermentation and ageing, production of higher-quality wines is poised to expand, creating more opportunities for UK merchants and restaurants looking to tap into the growing consumer curiosity surrounding amber wines.

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    Opinion
    Crémant de Loire

    Crémant de Loire puts the fizz back into Loire Valley sales

    Crémant de Loire goes from strength to strength, quadrupling sales to the UK in just four years. Saumur Brut, on the other hand, is treading water largely held afloat by a small number of massive sellers on the French supermarket scene. Peter Dean travels to Saumur and visits Ackerman and Langlois-Chateau, the biggest players in the Crémant de Loire scene, and discovers why they still have a strong presence in the market two hundred years on from first producing ‘Saumur Champagne’ – and how their rich heritage bodes well for their increasingly firm footing in exports.

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