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    Buying decisions from trend setting trade and The Buyer tastings

    Tasting: Wine
    Pol Roger Vintage 2013

    How Hubert de Billy met the many challenges of Pol Roger Vintage 2013

    Fifth generation family member and director of Pol Roger, Hubert de Billy, has been spending time recently on the bottling line sticking labels on bottles. Unglamorous work for the company ambassador but morale-boosting and a reflection of how tight this family-owned house is run. On the eve of the launch of the new Pol Roger Vintage 2013, Anne Krebiehl MW talks to de Billy about how they achieved balance in the wine in such a difficult year and why 2013 could be likened to Paris’s Pompidou Centre.

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    Tasting: Wine
    La Dolce Vite 2

    Tasting Enotria&Coe’s new Italian reds you need to have on your radar

    Piedmont and Tuscany will always command the most attention when it comes to putting an Italian wine on your list – these are ‘must haves’ – but Campania, Sardinia, Veneto and Alto Adige are regions that also feature wines of stunning quality that can be a fraction of the price. Peter Dean picks out seven red wines from Enotria&Coe’s extensive Italian portfolio which features wines from all seven of these regions.

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    Tasting: Wine
    2019 Austrian

    Erste Lagen launch shows real strength of 2019 Austrian vintage

    To its credit the Austrian winemakers association, the Österreichische Traditionsweingüter (OTW), managed to keep Covid at bay at this month’s annual showing of the Erste Lagen (premier cru) wines. Not only was the event safely marshalled but conversation steered away from the pandemic and rightly concentrated on the 2019 Austrian vintage which is quite spectacular. David Kermode reports back on how the event was managed as well as picks out his 10 best wines you need to have on your buying radar.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Blanc des Millénaires 2006

    Understanding the DNA of Blanc des Millénaries 2006

    The new Charles Heidsieck Blanc des Millénaires 2006 is only the sixth vintage of this wine to be released since 1983 and yet it has an identity all of its own. Made up equally of fruit from five crus in the Côte des Blancs, Charles Heidsieck cellar master Cyril Brun tells Anne Krebiehl MW how each of the villages plays a part, and how bitterness in the finished wine is increasingly becoming a key component as a result of climate change.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Penfolds Grange 2016

    First taste of Penfolds Grange 2016 & co. with Peter Gago

    It is one of the highlights of the year, of course, when Penfolds chief winemaker Peter Gago launches the new Penfolds Collection, and takes the floor in front of hundreds of journalists, showing that, if he hadn’t become one of the world’s top winemakers he could easily have cut it on the standup comedy circuit. Yesterday’s launch of Penfolds Grange 2016 was a little different – six wine writers in London’s 67 Pall Mall club with Gago beamed in live on Zoom. The wines were all present and correct and were showing well. Our man at the tasting was Australian wine expert and chef Roger Jones who assesses each wine in full.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Tinwood

    7 magnificent English wineries that need to be on your radar

    With his wine explorer wings clipped by Covid, Justin Keay set about trying to discover in England the four best wines from four wineries he picked from four counties. In this piece he visits Greyfriars in Surrey and Tinwood Estate in West Sussex, a winery that is probably the largest English producer you’ve never heard of. After picking his four wines, Keay then went on to explore five more wineries including Litmus Wines, Cottonworth, Danebury and Kingscote Estate and recommends which wines are the ones you should be buying.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Hugh Johnson ©Esa Korjula (1)

    Hugh Johnson: What 10 wines we should be drinking in 2021

    Hugh Johnson OBE is the world’s best-selling wine writer with the publication of new editions of his Pocket Wine Book more consistent than a Port declaration. As the 2021 edition is released we caught up with him for a virtual coffee and chat to find out how he has been during the pandemic, what unexpected benefits there have been and which new winemaking countries have been impressing him… including Belgium. He also goes into some detail about which are the top 10 wines we should be trying in 2021

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    Tasting: Wine
    Arras

    Assessing the new sparkling from Tasmania’s House of Arras

    So impressed was Roger Jones with the sparkling wines of Tasmania’s House of Arras that, when he ran a Michelin-starred restaurant, he had the Arras Grand Vintage as his house pour. Ed Carr, winemaker at Arras, was awarded a lifetime achievement award at last year’s CSWWC awards, for which Jones is a judge, and for the new releases it was only natural that Carr took Jones through the new wines including a 13 year-old Rosé and the Arras Late Disgorged.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Langham

    Discover ‘New England’ sparkling: 4 counties, 4 wineries, 4 wines

    Unable this year to visit the far-flung wine-producing countries that tickle his palate, Justin Keay decided to set himself a challenge. Pick four different English wineries, that each have to be in different counties, and then pick one wine from each. And, rather than the larger estates and household names, he decided to visit the smaller wineries that may well be flying under your radar. Four Counties, Four Wineries, Four Wines Part 1 – Langham Wine Estate and Black Chalk Wine.

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    Tasting: Wine
    BC 1

    New ‘pop-up’ cuvée series: Rendez-Vous de Billecart-Salmon

    Limited edition cuvées are all the rage these days in Champagne, the latest in the fold being Billecart-Salmon which has just launched a new series of ‘pop-up’ cuvées called Les Rendez-Vous de Billecart-Salmon; wines where ‘when they’re gone they’re gone’. First in this series is No.1 Meunier Extra Brut which is a 3-crus 100% Meunier that is largely from the 2014 vintage and has spent 52 months on its lees – a wine that has come straight out of the House’s penchant for experimentation.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Czech

    Justin Keay: Which are the best Czech wineries to look out for?

    Following last month’s successful insight into the Czech wine revolution, Justin Keay here looks at how the Czech wine industry is at a fascinating crossroads – between catering largely for the home market and following Hungary and Austria’s example of successfully exporting to international markets. There is also a huge range of different styles of wine made from a very large number of grape varieties – both international and indigenous – that collectively reflect one of Czech wine’s main strengths, namely, producing highly drinkable wines with a high degree of freshness. Keay is a fan and picks out the wineries that you should be keeping an eye on.

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    Tasting: Wine
    La Dolce Vite

    How Enotria&Coe celebrated La Dolce Vite without Vinitaly

    Vinitaly is the key date in the diary for all those in the trade responsible for buying and selling Italian wine. But with the Verona-based fair cancelled this year, Enotria&Coe decided to celebrate La Dolce Vite in the only way it could – sending a case of their best Italian wines to key personnel with a mini film of each producer introducing their wines.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Zweigelt

    Why Austrian Zweigelt is changing to a more serious wine

    Zweigelt is Austria’s most widely planted red grape: famously fruity, seductively spicy, with a name that many find unsavoury because of who created it. Until now, the variety has been celebrated as a relatively simple, crowd-pleasing bistro wine, but if the producers from the Lower Austrian region of Carnuntum get their way, that perception is about to change, as we get to know the variety’s serious side.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Grant Burge

    Grant Burge and Barossa Valley ‘ring in’ the wine style changes

    As Grant Burge releases its new 2018 vintage wines, chief winemaker Craig Stansborough explains how the style of winemaking is evolving through the years, what recent vintages have been like, which are the ones to put on your buying radar and how Barossa Valley, in general, is moving with the times – in the use of oak, whole bunch, yeasts and vineyard management. Full tasting notes including a ‘ripper’ 2016 Meshach and a museum 2012 release.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Weingut Rudolf Fürst Long Read

    Why the Rudolf Fürst 2018 Pinot Noirs may be Germany’s finest

    Anne Krebiehl MW knows a thing or two about Spätburgunder. The Wines of Germany author simply adores Pinot Noir and when she met Sebastian Fürst and his father Paul from Weingut Rudolf Fürst for a tasting of their new 2018 vintage, she simply declared that she may have tried Germany’s finest. Well known in Germany, but under the radar in the UK, these wines are the purest elegance in a glass.

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    Tasting: Wine
    judge

    Roger Jones on being sober as a judge – for three competitions

    Since ‘retiring’ from running his Michelin Star restaurant, The Harrow at Little Bedwyn, Roger and Sue Jones have been running a gastronomic ‘takeaway’ from their premises where customers can buy some of Jones’s signature dishes along with paired premium wines. Jones has also been a judge on three global wine competitions – judging wines from Alsace and three New World regions for the International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC), Australian wines for the Decanter World Wine Awards (DWWA) and next month working with the Champagne and Sparkling Wine World Championships (CSWWC). So what approach does a wine expert/ chef take to the judging process and how has the dreaded C-word affected things?

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    Tasting: Wine
    Akitu Pinot Blanc

    Akitu turns ‘a whiter shade of Pinot’ with new Pinot Noir Blanc

    Akitu has always had a very pure proposition – only producing two Pinot Noirs, Akitu A1 and Akitu A2, that show two sides of the same coin, namely the special terroir of the Wanaka end of Central Otago. So, when Andrew Donaldson and winemaker PJ Charteris decided to make a white wine it naturally enough had be a ‘Blanc de Noirs’, a wine that is as unusual as it is seductive, writes Anne Krebiehl MW. Here she reveals the full story behind Akitu Pinot Noir Blanc 2019 plus the new A1 and A2 from 2018, a vintage that created some serious challenges all of its own.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Czech wine

    How to start exploring the exciting new world of Czech wine

    Post-Communism the Czech wine industry focussed on getting the basics right but since 2007 winemakers have started taking concepts like terroir, low intervention and organic more seriously. The landscape is varied, there’s an exciting diversity of styles and grape varieties, lower alcohol wine is a thing and there is a strong, concerted move to be producing Czech wines with a strong sense of place.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Willamette Pinot Noir Long Read

    ‘Goldilocks’ 2018 vintage shines at Willamette Pinot Noir auction

    The 5th annual Willamette Pinot Noir auction 2020 goes live from today (August 11-13) focussing on the ‘Goldilocks’ 2018 vintage. Like most world events it is being held online, although the other major change this year has come about because of the social unrest in Oregon following the death of George Floyd. For this reason the Willamette Valley Wineries Association is working with the James Beard Foundation to benefit Black and Indigenous Peoples of North America. L.M. Archer reports on the changes this year, a virtual seminar moderated by David Adelsheim on August 6 and previews some of the exciting lots that are up for grabs in the trade auction.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Merry Edwards

    How are Heidi von der Mehden’s 1st vintages at Merry Edwards?

    Although Heidi von der Mehden has been at California estate Merry Edwards for the past five years, 2018 was her first vintage fully in charge. Anne Krebiehl MW tastes the new 2018 Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc and AVA Pinots and hears first hand from Heidi where she is intending to take the wines. We learn too why the SB came out of Meredith Edwards’ distaste of the varietal, plus how pivotal the key UCD 37 clone of Pinot is, and how it came into being.

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    Instataste

    Tasting with pictures View All
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    • The first notion is of citric, bright freshness and almost of green apple. The second and third sniff then bring a richer notion, very subtle but still, of salted buttery shortbread. The palate is wonderfully taut, vivid with tiny, energetic, fine bubbles that speak of drive and tension. There is something bracing, bright and driven here. With more air and more temperature this mellows into the creamy, tart but smooth flesh of Golden Pearmain apples at the heart while that beautifully statuesque tautness and elegance remains. Where 2012 was generous and obvious, 2013 is reticent and calm. Where 2012 was opulent, 2013 is brisk. Where 2012 was the life and soul of the party, 2013 is contemplative, giving us clean-cut, grown-up charm and a whole world of refreshment. ( @anneinvino  ) The 2013 vintage was disgorged in December 2019 with a dosage of 8g/l and has an abv of 12.5%
    • One of three new red wines Roussillon-based biodynamic producer Le Soula is releasing this year, the 2009 alongside the 2014 and 2018, which gives a fascinating glimpse of vintages, styles and what the Roussillon is capable of. 2009 was a cracking vintage in the region and the nose offers the drinker so much promise that the wine delivers on the palate. It is a blend of 67% Carignan, 30% Syrah, and 3% Grenache Noir, most vines pretty old (some up to 70 years) and grown on largely granite at high altitude, the fruit is whole bunch pressed up to three weeks and then spending 21 months in a variety of wood formats and ages, but all large format and very little new wood. The wine is in secondary stage, although the acidity and freshness makes it feel so youthful. On the eye it is dark ruby with a redish hue,
    • Te Whare Ra single vineyard 2016 Marlborough Riesling ‘D’ 12.5% Dry style Riesling from New Zealand, yellow and green citrus predominate, lovely clipped dry stone textured, lemon juice finish. Clean and pure. Very light, almost colourless with a green hue; Classic Riesling nose – white flowers, lemon juice, kaffir lime leaf, green pineapple, hint of oily overalls; on the palate lemon sorbet predominates, lime juice, ripe grapefruit. There is good concentration and intensity, lean, mineral acidity, and good balance. Very particular style, - very fresh with the volume turned up on the citrus.
    • 2016 The Armagh Shiraz from Jim Barry. With James Halliday naming Jim Barry as the 2020 winery of the year and with this 2016 new vintage of The Armagh on full song, this has clearly been a good year for the Clare Valley estate. Still so young but this 100% Shiraz from 52 year old vines already has everything in its right place – so many delicious flavours and aromas, and a freshness and balance that prevents any feeling of heaviness. On the eye it’s very deep crimson, almost opaque; there’s a fabulous nose – enticing, complex, broody, alluring, it just gets better and better as it opens out in the glass; it’s a melange of aromas that includes black fruits (blackberry), black figs, dried apricots, wet stone, spiced earth, oak, and a distinctive graphite note; Medium-full bodied on the palate, the wine is fresh, and then ripe, but has
    • 100% Syrah from Stellenbosch, South Africa, from 2016, a vintage that was challenging primarily because of its dry conditions, reducing yield and increasing the concentration in the wine’s fruit profile. On the eye it is deep cherry red/ crimson; the nose is complex and powerful with notes of ripe cherry, wild hedgerow fruit, blackberry syrup, vanilla oak (14 months in 300l French oak), white pepper and wild mushroom; the wine is medium weight and the palate equally complex with black plum, cumin, rosemary, dark chocolate and liquorice. The tannins are firm and well integrated, there is intensity and concentration to the wine, quite an earthy/ dry stone texture with a sappy finish. The wine is immensely drinkable, with or without food, good bang for your buck at £15 retail in the UK
    • 100th anniversary bottling of Delamain’s Pale and Dry XO Cognac – the youngest release from the house with an average age of 25 years – which has been given a packaging refresh and added intensity with an extra 2% more alcohol. On the eye it is light to mid gold, with an orange/ light brown hue; the nose is elegant, with fruity notes of raisins, vanilla pod, apricot, grapefruit, citrus, fresh fig, a little rancio and leather; the front palate is light, naturally sweet, intense flavours of apricot, dried fruits, tingly on the tongue and then finishes with a lovely dry, smooth, long length. Just so light and smooth in the mouth. Delamain does not add caramel or sugar and reduces the alcohol in the blend with older cognac at a lower proof rather than with water. The bottle size of the Pale & Dry Centenaire has been reduced from
    • Charles Heidsieck Blanc des Millénaires 2006, Blanc de Blancs, 12% The first whiff is of buttery, smooth mellowness and rich, buttery shortbread. With more air, there is this serene, gentle but profound fruit of ripe Golden Pearmain apple. The palate is utterly mellow with more of that smooth, rounded, cashmere-like texture and fine mousse. But despite this rounded richness, the actual body remains sinuous, slender, bright. It is vivid with enlivening, soothing freshness and the cool chalky depth of the Côte des Blancs. It is the very austerity of these soils that stands in beautiful and compelling contrast to the buttery richness – this pulls the most glorious trick. On the finish there is a fine, textured seaweed saltiness paired with an incipient, mouth-watering bitterness that draws you in. It makes the next sip compulsive. With air and temperature, the saline tang gets ever more pronounced. This is dangerously delicious
    • Penfolds Grange 2016. Shiraz with 3% Cabernet. Roger Jones writes: “Is it as good as the 2015? well it is certainly more forward. Gage’s tasting notes are always worth a read and his tasting notes for the Penfolds Grange 2016 include this epic paragraph: “A fusion of preserved figs, black plum, blackberry and black liquorice flirts with an aromatic elation of fish oil, anchovy, soy and sesame.” I would add a darkness, tobacco, soy, and the whiff of a barrel of salted anchovies, rich wagyu beef. To begin with it is lively exciting, alluring, then as the complexity grows on the palate it is saying “give me some time”, but certainly does not need 40 years and would be a fabulous wine within five years, even sooner if it was decanted and served in a suitable glass. Many people like their Grange with 40-50 years on the clock but it
    • Côtes Catalanes Blanc from Marjorie and Stéphane Gallet, winemakers at Domaine Le Roc Des Anges, a 100% single parcel Grenache Gris from North-facing vines planted on schist soil in 1954. This is a dry white that is as intriguing as it sounds – complex too – and easily wears the mantle of ‘fine wine’. Straw coloured, light gold; clean and pure on the nose, limestone mineral, nashi pear, lemon blossom, almond oil, touch of lychee; the acidity is quite austere even after six years, the palate is fresh, lean, pure with lemon flesh, saline and a length that goes on for minutes, more to do with the acidity than the alcohol which is a mere 12.5% abv, given that many whites in the region touch 15% no problem. Tasted blind you might put this in Saumur or say it was a young Kumeu River.
    • Chardonnay 2018, Kelly Washington Wines. This is a wine with real presence that wants you to sit up and notice it right from the get-go, from the intensity of the aromas through to the palate weight and balance to the delicious refined flavours and long length. This is only the second of Kelly Washington’s wines I have tried (apart from Seresin for which she is the winemaker) and it is clear she is a genuine talent – walking that often uneasy tightrope between New and Old World styles with such aplomb. Hard to believe that this is only the second vintage of working with this fruit. Bright gold/ green hue on the eye; fruit and toasty oak which (with time in the glass) opens out into ripe orchard fruit, pineapple, toasted nuts, barley sugar, butter; mid-weight palate, fresh, bright acidity, lovely ripeness to the fruit, really juicy mouth-feel, hit of
    • Medium dry Chenin Blanc from one of the best in Saumur in the Loire, and just entering its drinking window – the austere acidity meeting the fleshy orchard fruits halfway now and presenting itself spectacularly well. Mid gold; complex nose of grapefruit peel, ripe pear, windfall apples, hits of honey, adhesive, slightly oxidative; the mouthfeel is concentrated, acidity is pretty brisk still and tart but integrated, just ripe orange flesh, lime zest, kafir lime leaf, yuzu. Great with or without food. We paired it with a spicy stir fry Thai prawn dish which worked well. But a quiet glass on your own contemplating this winemaker’s phenomenal style is just as good!
    • In his review of this wine in release Robert Parker said “There is just one chance to get the Kabinett style back here: store it for 6-10 years.” How right he was! The rich, almost Spätlese sweetness has integrated more and the wine is more balanced. That acidity is right there, laser-like from the first sip, on the front palate, tingling with minerality. The nose and the palate are all rich orchard, stone and exotic fruit - Williams pear tatin, mango, tinned peach, pineapple - and there is still honeysuckle on the nose. No oily rag/ petrol in sight. Golden, 8.5% abv. Joyous.
    •  @rogerjoneslittlebedwyn  writes “I have been aware of Arras for many years and the Arras Grand Vintage (current vintage is the 07, the 08 was released first) was sold as our house pour at The Harrow at Little Bedwyn for many years. Retailing at just shy of £40 with seven years on lees before further ageing before release this has a distinct oyster/brioche nose, winemaker Ed Carr attributes this to the cool breezes, with the Antarctic a nearby land mass, giving a cool maritime climate. The wine is complex and layered, honeyed, delicate tiny bubbles rock up from the base, hints of grapefruit pith, touch of Greek yoghurt and dried tea spices. 78% Chardonnay and 22% Pinot Noir.” For a run-down of all the new  @houseofarras  vintages check out www.the-Buyer.net
    • First in a new series of limited edition cuvées from Billecart-Salmon comes this 100% Meunier from 3 different crus. The series is called Les Rendez-Vous de Billecart-Salmon No.1 and more ‘pop-up’ cuvées are promised soon. Vinified in steel tank with 52 months on the lees. Tasting-wise: The wine opens with a slightly floral aspect and a hint of pear tart with lemon overtones. There is a sense of levity, but more air introduces a more brooding, darker notion of candlewax. That lovely but full-flavoured lightness also characterises the palate with wonderfully bright tension. Again that darker, somehow earthy Meunier note adds a hint of waxiness that almost verges onto smokiness – especially on the finish – while the surface remains bright, light and lemony. The mousse is fine and the wine has a pleasant suppleness and this sense of lightness just begs for another sip. (AK)
    • Museum release of a great Barossa vintage. The winemaking has changed a little these days in that where the 2016 has 35% new oak the 2012 had 65% new oak, detectable with a bit more toastiness on the nose. Less whole bunch was used – 8% in this case. To taste: Deep blood red with ruby edging; on the nose black fruits dominate (plum, mulberry) – with dark chocolate, liquorice, tar, olive, a touch of graphite; the palate is similarly complex but the overriding impression is of how the sweetness of the fruit knits in with the structure of the wine, with still-firm acidity and velvety tannins. Black cherry, cooked blackberries, plums, dark chocolate. The wine is in a really great place now and can cellar for a further decade at least.
    • One of the iconic single vineyard Barbarescos that is made to be versatile, either for early drinking or many years hence. 100% Nebbiolo from the Bordini site, 270m high in the village of Neive in the Barbaresco production zone. It’s a four hectare south-facing site on calcareous soils, and the vines have an average age of between 26 and 29 years. The site is sustainably farmed with no use of chemical herbicides or pesticides. The wine undergoes malolactic fermentation, and is then aged between 20 and 22 months, 50% in new and 50% in one-year-old medium-toasted French oak. It then spends three months in steel before being bottled for a further 12 months, no filtration or clarifying. To taste: Light, almost see-through cherry red/ russet; the nose is a fascinating mix of red berry fruit (raspberry, wild strawberry), red rose petals, marzipan, and a savoury quality (leather) and toasty; the
    • Wow. This really is something. We might know the more standard style better but here is the Double Oaked @Woodfordreserve which means double helpings of silky  #bourbon   #whiskey  sweetness. As  @vinesack  says like a “big sticky toffee pudding in a glass”. It’s also the wonderful vanilla notes on the nose and palate that really make this a sipping bourbon extraordinnaire. Available in  @masterofmalt  for around £48. Part of the selection being promoted in UK and Europe through  @spiritsfromtheus   #bartender   #cocktails  By  @richardsiddle 
    • Saperavi, Qvevri Bouquet 2016, Mildiani Family Winery Great when a wine is way better than you expected it to be. This is 100% Saperavi, Georgia’s most prolific red grape variety that, in the wrong hands, can be too acidic and quite challenging. This example was quite sublime and outstanding. Vinified and aged in a qvevri (old-fashioned underground clay tank) this had a voluptuous mouthfeel, was complex, spicy and yet remarkably rounded for a Saperavi. On the eye it is intensely blood red; the aromas are black fruit, spice tin (black cardamom, cloves), bay leaf, jamon; the wine is medium to full bodied, with a complex array of flavours: wild black berries, liquorice, grilled meat, tobacco. There is richness, depth of flavour, ripe tannins and the acidity, well integrated and holding it all together. We paired this with spicy chicken and vegetable couscous which worked well, we also enjoyed it after
    • Alta Langa Millesimato Pas Dose, 2014, Contratto Founded in 1867, Contratto is Italy’s oldest Metodo Classico producer, boasting massive underground cellars and 45 hectares of vines, some of which are 850m above sea level. In 2011 Giorgio Rivetti of La Spinetta acquired Contratto, adding sparkling wines, bitters and vermouths to his range of Barbaresco and Barolo. The Millesimato Pas Dose is a blend of 80% Pinot Nero and Chardonnay; only the free-run juice is used, once fermented the wine is then aged until May, before being blended and bottled for the second fermentation. The wine is then aged on lees for another four years before release. To taste, the Pas Dose has as much elegance and finesse as the bottle’s distinctive Art Deco label. It is straw yellow in colour with a fine persistent bead; on the nose there are notes of white flowers, green apple; on the palate the
    • ‘Grossi Läue’ Gewurtztraminer, 2011, Famille Hugel This is just superb – a great vintage, almost as big as 2009 and with acidity up there with 1996. Mid gold; a nose that you could spend an eternity immersed in without even having to drink the wine (!)– so pure, complex and voluptuous as it is; fresh rose petals, jasmine blossom, barley sugar, frangiapani, lily, tangerine, pineapple flesh, mango, they all ebb and flow and make a magnificent whole. The palate is an exercise in perfect balance – the fruit is pure and velvety, the mouthfeel is generous and full-bodied and yet has a sappy quality and finishes fresh and tense with the acidity cleansing the palate, ready for the next mouthful. Wow!