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    Buying decisions from trend setting trade and The Buyer tastings

    Tasting: Spirit
    St-Rémy

    Tasting the new St-Rémy: finished in Sauternes and dark rum casks

    Brandy finished in casks that have contained Sauternes and also dark Barbados rum, are the two latest additions to St-Rémy’s Cask Finish Collection which is an attempt to court the younger spirits drinker, but also to allow master blender Cécile Roudaut the opportunity to be creative and just a little daring, writes Victor Smart. So how do they taste and what do you pair them with?

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    Tasting: Wine
    Spanish Garnacha Long Read

    Spanish Wine Academy taps into the buzz around Spanish Garnacha

    For a variety of reasons Grenache has had a reputation of being a grape that’s only good as a blending partner – on its own it has traditionally been seen as a grape that makes high alcohol, structureless, fruit-forward wines, prone to oxidation. But how times have changed. Single-varietal Grenache could not be more on-trend as winemakers across the world use modern, more sympathetic winemaking styles that best suit the grape. A masterclass from the Spanish Wine Academy earlier this year, that focused on Spanish Garnacha, predicted even greater popularity for this category and to prove the point sampled seven very different styles of how winemakers in Spain are approaching the grape. Peter Dean reports.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Hatch Mansfield

    David Kermode sent to the Tower for Hatch Mansfield tasting

    Hatch Mansfield chairman Patrick McGrath MW describes the present challenges facing the drinks industry as a ‘shit show’. With stock stuck in ports all around the world, the climate affecting yields and more, it was impressive that the importer’s autumn showcase was a well-tempered affair full of blisteringly good wines. Held at the Tower of London, David Kermode, aka Mr Vinosaurus also managed to keep his cool at the tasting and picks a Top 10 of wines that really turned his head.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Cloudy Bay 2021

    How Cloudy Bay 2021 stacks up in its new era of winemaking

    Another year another new vintage – Cloudy Bay 2021 was launched in the UK yesterday, sadly by Zoom again, with technical director Jim White stepping in for winemaker Daniel Sorrell who has handled the previous run of releases. With newly-appointed senior winemaker Nikolai St George joining last September from 2021’s New Zealand winery of the year, Giesen Wines, there are clearly changes underway. How much of that is down to the new hierarchy is too soon to tell but White does reveal that Te Koko is undergoing an overhaul and the style of Cloudy Bay 2021 is different to the 2020. There is also the considerable issues of a 30% drop in yield and getting the wine onto a ship – anytime, anywhere would be nice. Peter Dean reports.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Cocchi Barolo Chinato tipo Esportazione

    Blast from the past: Cocchi’s 130th anniversary Barolo Chinato

    Found in Cocchi’s archives, the recipe for Cocchi Barolo Chinato tipo Esportazione was brought back to life in a limited edition to celebrate the great Italian company’s 130th anniversary. Such a special Barolo Chinato deserved a special send-off which it got at Hide in London’s Mayfair – mixologist Oskar Kinberg had devised a series of bespoke cocktails to celebrate Cocchi’s vermouths and Americano while chef Ollie Dabbous was at the controls in the kitchen – devising the menu and in particular a warm ‘acorn’ cake with smoked caramel and liqueur to pair with the Chinato. Victor Smart reports.

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    Tasting: Wine
    PICTURE 1

    Many wine discoveries at Famille Helfrich’s Manchester tasting

    In just over 40 years Joseph Helfrich has turned Les Grands Chais de France from a 5,000 franc loan into one of the world’s most important wine producing groups – currently worth €1.14bn and accounting for over a fifth of all France’s wine exports. Famille Helfrich is the group’s exclusive on-trade and independent retail arm that is showing over 200 of its wines at two UK tastings. The London event is next Tuesday while the Manchester one just happened with Mike Turner suitably impressed with what was on offer – especially a wine from Gascogne that is £3.68 DPD.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Batàr

    David Kermode on 30 years of Querciabella’s magnificent Batàr

    Compared to the finest crus of Burgundy by some of the world’s leading wine critics, Querciabella’s Batàr is no ordinary white wine from Tuscany. Celebrating its 30th year with the 2018 vintage, this is a Pinot Bianco/ Chardonnay blend that has an almost uncanny ability to age. To prove the point and to launch the new vintage, winemaker Manfred Ing lined up a once-in-a-lifetime vertical for David Kermode, including the very first vintage – 1998 – that Kermode describes as a ‘miracle’.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Fine Wines Direct

    How a slim portfolio at Fine Wines Direct UK pays dividends

    As most UK-based importers expand their portfolios this year, one company is defiantly swimming against the tide by only offering on and off-trade customers one estate per country or region represented. The approach by Cardiff-based Fine Wines Direct UK means that it can import in bulk, offering customers competitive prices and good stock availability. For the wine producers it also means that their wines do not have to compete against other wines from the same region. But what of the selection and the wines themselves? Justin Keay tasted through part of the range which includes Pesquera, Marqués des Cáceres, Carrau, Allan Scott, Thorn-Clarke and Escorihuela Gascon.

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    Tasting: Wine
    IMG_4366

    How Enotria & Coe tasting proved it is ‘back with a bang’

    Enotria & Coe’s Decameron tasting was the first of the major importer tastings this autumn and it was packed to the rafters with exciting new wines and spirits, producers eager to get back into the fold, and 1200 buyers keen to do business and hear about E&C’s spectacular Christmas peak sales levels. David Kermode, aka Mr Vinosaurus, sampled the new lines and picks out a Top 10 that caught his eye, as well as talks to managing director Sam Thackeray about the company’s current triumphs and challenges.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Emilio Moro

    How innovation lies at the heart of Bodegas Emilio Moro

    José Moro, at Ribera del Duero’s Bodegas Emilio Moro, is the first winemaker to have been picked as one of the top 100 global business leaders in the field of innovation and creativity by Forbes Spain. His latest project, Sensing4Farming, developed hand-in-hand with Vodafone, is aimed at creating a high quality sustainable vineyard that can be managed completely digitally. And yet his wines also have tradition at their core – fine Tempranillo that speaks of the land from which it comes. Geoffrey Dean reports.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Emrich Schönleber

    The fine balance in the Rieslings of the Nahe’s Emrich-Schönleber

    The Nahe is one of Germany’s smallest wine regions featuring just nine producers but, with Donnhoff and Emrich-Schönleber amongst them, it includes some of the country’s best sites for making Riesling. Peter Dean tastes and rates a range of wines from Emrich-Schönleber including four dry style wines, a Kabinett and an Auslese, and talks to owner/ winemaker Frank Schönleber about achieving a delicate sense of balance in his wines.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Bancroft

    Top picks from Bancroft’s Edinburgh Snapshot tasting

    Bancroft Wines may have added 60 new producers and increased by a third the amount of wines it represents, but it was the trimmed-down approach of its Snapshot tastings that appealed to Mike Turner. By pre-selecting wines that suit the region Turner, a Bancroft customer, felt that everything on show was suitable and the amount of wines to taste on the day of manageable proportions. He travelled to Edinburgh, one of three tastings Bancroft held, and picks for us nine wines that are either great value, worth a punt or an absolute stand-out.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Mauro Veglio

    2017 Barolo: Mauro Veglio on following the ‘near perfect’ 2016s

    2016 was generally regarded as one of the greatest modern vintages of Barolo and was always going to be a hard act to follow. But the 2017 Barolos from Mauro Veglio are still delivering an immense amount of pleasure, argues Geoffrey Dean, who hears first hand from the estate’s Alessandro Veglio how the winery is using them to spearhead a greater presence in the UK on-trade.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Aussie Grenache

    How Grenache is bouncing back in Barossa and McLaren Vale

    Aussie Grenache is on the rebound, as it is across much of the rest of the globe. Exploited for so long as a workhorse grape for fortified wines and as a blending partner, it is now beginning to be better understood as a variety. In Australia, particularly in Barossa and McLaren Vale, it is being re-planted in profusion with crush prices reaching an all-time high. Grenache is simply on-trend and to prove it Wine Australia asked Sarah Ahmed and Mark Pygott MW to each pick three wines from Barossa and McLaren Vale to better understand how Grenache is experiencing premiumisation. Justin Keay brings his own views to the table and confesses to being very impressed by the wines and also the standard of the presentation.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Exton Park RB45

    How Exton Park RB45 is tearing a page out of Champagne’s book

    October’s launch of Exton Park RB45 is the completion of the new quartet of wines from this influential English estate – joining a trio of reserve-based wines that were launched this April. To achieve a House style and avoid the vagaries of the sometimes inclement Hampshire weather, Exton Park’s new range of English Sparkling Wines owes more than a passing nod to Champagne. Exton Park RB, or Reserve Blend, is a range of four wines that are all multi-vintage and made from up-to 45 different base wines. David Kermode had an audience with winemaker Corinne Seely to find out how she is aiming to make Exton Park “an English Bollinger” and to taste and rate the new wines. Peter Dean visits the virtual launch of the RB45 and provides full tasting notes.

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    Tasting: Wine
    WineGB

    Roger Jones picks his hits from the long-awaited WineGB tasting

    It was one of the hottest days of the year and it was hotly anticipated – the day WineGB held its first showcase trade and press tasting since you-know-what. Chef and sparkling wine expert Roger Jones went to catch up with some old faces and to see how the British wine industry is continuing to evolve and excel, but it was also an opportunity to discover some new wineries and plenty of new cuvées. Whitehall Vineyard was a new producer, specialising in still wines, sparkling champ Dermot Sugrue had some impressive new cuvées, and Hattingley’s still wines were just some of Roger’s many highlights. And how about Multi-Vintage as a more positive way of describing Non Vintage?

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    Tasting: Wine
    Romania

    How the new Cramele Recas 2020 vintage wines are tasting

    Setting up a winery in Romania after the fall of the Ceausescu regime was a masterstroke for Cramele Recas co-founder Philip Cox and his fellow directors. It has allowed him to build a winery of scale with state-of-the-art equipment, using a mix of bought-in and estate fruit, with more and more hectares of vine planted with indigenous and international grape varieties. The wines are quality and value-driven and with the eight that Cox has selected to represent the 2020 vintage, there is a wide mix of fascinating blends and winemaking techniques that play to a mainstream audience, at the same time as pushing the envelope in key areas.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Washington State wine Long Read

    Which Washington State wines are the Evergreen state’s best?

    London’s annual Washington State Wine tasting was one of the last ‘live’ events to be held in March 2020, before the pandemic struck. 16 months later and Geoffrey Dean attended this year’s event which showcased 91 wines from 13 producers. The well known names of Chateau Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, Reynvaan, Gramercy Cellars, Betz and L’Ecole No 41 were all there but what made this event even more fascinating was the sheer amount of wines coming from lesser known estates and ones which are seeking representation in the UK.

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    Tasting: Wine
    IMG_2037

    How Roederer’s Collection 242 is a vintage Champagne in disguise

    In a brave about-face, Louis Roederer has ditched its best-selling Brut Premier NV cuvée and replaced it with the new Louis Roederer Collection 242, a multi-vintage blend that uses both a string of reserve wines and a high proportion of a solera-style Perpetual Reserve – created in 2012 and topped up after subsequent harvests. Underlying the move is cellar master Jean-Baptiste Lécaillon’s vision to cope with warming temperatures in the region and to create an unique NV that gets increasingly complex with each subsequent harvest.

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    Tasting: Wine
    123492492_671313973520479_4359164174877711841_n Long Read

    Justin Keay on the growing strength of English still wine

    The impact that British wine has made both domestically and in international markets has been spearheaded by its sparkling wines. But what of English still wine? For too long it has played second fiddle – obtaining the right fruit ripeness from the unpredictable British climate, and also making wine at a competitive price point have not helped. But there are now so many examples of top quality still wine made on these shores that wine scribe Justin Keay decided to take a closer look, visiting a number of estates over the summer and focusing on two in particular – Balfour and Tillingham – that have approached still production from opposite ends of the wine spectrum.

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    Instataste

    Tasting with pictures View All
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    • Ludopata Marselan, Tringario, Chile 2020 A fascinating opportunity to try a 100% Marselan the cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache that only officially came into existence 31 years ago, but has since been named as one of the four new grape varieties to be approved in Bordeaux as a way of combatting temperature increases. Mainly grown to date in the Languedoc, this example was made in Chile and fermented in concrete eggs, so it really is a great example of the variety in a ‘pure’ form. Very deep cherry red with purple edges, the nose is fresh, full-on black fruit, cherry, plum, blackcurrant; the palate is medium-weight, rounded, smooth and then displays structure and just-ripe tannins, balance maintained with a splash or blood orange acidity. I liked this and worked well with a vegetarian supper.
    • Ranci Dolc NV from Priorat’s Mas Martinet. This is a naturally sweet traditional wine based on Garnacha grapes that are left to dry for two to three weeks after harvest, the fermentation taken up to 16% abv is done in a solera system with some components over 100 years old and a system of very old barrels that are well above 100 years old. Nothing is added and the wine is not treated in any way, the residual sugar clocking in at about 80 gms/l To look at the wine is medium to deep mahogany brown, cloudy; the nose and taste are both extraordinary and quite original – like a cross between a Madeira and a very old Oloroso sherry. Hugely complex bouquet that evolves in the glass and mixes walnut shells, caramel, manuka honey, sea salt, balsamic, leather, polished wood, alcohol-steeped macerated fruit; full-bodied, oleaginous, sweet and sour –
    • The latest super-premium wine from Gérard Bertrand, an orange one, that is intended to sit at the high table alongside his Clos d’Ora and Clos du Temple, RRP €160 direct. It’s a blend of Roussanne, Vermentino and Viognier, all destemmed and fermented and aged for eight months in a mix of barrel and amphora. To look at the wine has a fascinating colour – medium amber-gold, with orange highlights; the nose is complex and opens in the glass, surprisingly garriguey with boxwood, saffron and wild herbs, dried flowers, orange blossom honey and orange peel, a sweet lifted floral note on the tail; the palate is medium-bodied, structured but not overly so and without the dry stone texture and dryness you associate with orange wines. The flavours are layered with orange marmalade, apricot, sweet lemon; the length is long with a twist of saline. Beautifully crafted (like Clos du Temple), this
    • 2021 Cloudy Bay - To look at the wine is water-like, almost colourless with a pale green hue; the nose is intensely fruity but more on the greener end of the spectrum – grapefruit, gooseberry, lemon verbena, lime, lemongrass. There is not a lot of passion fruit in there, some white peach (two of the thiols the team actively seeks) but again these notes are more discreet than in previous years. The nose is not dissimilar to the 2020. The palate, however, is different from 2020 in that it feels more balanced. The attack is tense and racy with gooseberry and grapefruit pith, but where the 2020 vintage then had an overt smash of concentrated lime-green apple acidity that almost exploded in your mouth, the 2021 has this at its core but there is more weight on the palate, more flesh on the bones – it feels overall more rounded,
    • Produced only in the best years, La Perle 2012 is a Grand Cru vintage Champagne that is a blend of 80% Chardonnay and 20% Pinot Noir from Chouilly, Cramant, Le Mesnil-Sur-Oger and Verzy, aged under cork for 8 years. Brilliant gold with a fine delicate bead; the nose is fresh and complex, ripe fruit – pear, white peach – is joined by vanilla cream, a touch of orange peel and spicy notes of clove, acacia honey and pastry touches, a twist of blond tobacco perhaps; throughout there is an overriding sense of freshness that I always associate with a cold, wet chalk cave. The palate is tense, mineral, precise and detailed, poached orchard fruits – apple and pear – fresh hazelnut, there’s a delightfully crisp texture and bright, long finish. Drinking so beautifully now as an aperitif or with a multitude of dish-pairing capabilities and will cellar for 20+ years
    • Chapoutier’s top red wine from 3.5 hectares of old vines on the top of the hill at Hermitage, planted on pure granitic soil. The wine is still in its infancy but, along with Le Pavillon Rouge and Les Greffieux, tasted alongside, the wine in 2020 is so approachable now with super ripe, silky tannins. Impenetrably dark, the bouquet is complex and dark, less dried herbs than Greffieux, but with an element of red fruit along with the dark wild bramble. There are grilled and smoky notes but also a pretty floral element that lends elegance. In the mouth the wine has huge power and structure of course, the mouthfeel is rounded with fine texture, silky tannins, layers of black fruit, peony, truffle and Chinese ink. Stunning with a long, long life ahead of it.
    • Yes this is a serious label and yes this is actually a seriously made wine – Pais (aka Mission – geddit?) from 120-150 year old vines grown in the Colchagua (Cold Shower – geddit?) Valley in Chile. Fruit-forward, glubbable or smashable, this is a wine for pure enjoyment and will be a crowd-pleaser at many an occasion – certainly a talking point with the label. The nose is complex, red fruit-driven (raspberry, plum), the palate is medium weight, with the grape’s acidity and dry stone texture balancing the fruitiness of the wine. 14% but it feels lighter and fresher. A lot of fun.
    • Pesseroles 2018. 2nd vintage of a fascinating complex orange wine from Priorat’s Mas Martinet that took ten years of production before winemaker Sara Perez felt it was right to release onto the market. It’s oxidative, exotic, spicy and savoury and totally beguiling. The wine is a field blend of six varieties including Picpoul, Garnacha Blanca and Pedro Ximenez that is foot-trodden then transferred to glass demi-john and clay amphora for three months with 30% skins and stems. To look at the wine is deep orange gold, the wine has notes of peach, dried apricot, turmeric, cloves and honey. At first the mouthfeel is fresh and juicy, then becomes more textured and bone dry, with a dry stone textured, saline finish. Bags of flavour – this would be a natural fit with some smoked, salted almonds watching the sun sink into the sea.
    • New limited edition 2013 vintage Blanc de Noirs from a very tricky vintage – overall a cool year but also featuring most of what nature could throw at the region – very hot summer, thunderstorms. Bollinger used a late harvest and (atypically) only Pinot Noir grapes for this special cuvée. (La Grande Année which has a percentage of Chardonnay in it was not made in this vintage). Light bright, shiny, platinum gold; Sumptuous aromas whet the appetite primarily of citrus and white peach, red berries, hints of tropical fruit with layers of creamy vanilla bean, sea spray, and leesy notes that hint of a smoked and grilled-nut future ahead of it – if you can keep your hands off it. Crisp, precise, detailed attack, with plenty of tension, then a mouth-filling mousse with many shades of lemon and lime, tarte au citron, tarte tatin, fresh white almonds. The texture is
    • Pinot Gris 2018, Jolie-Laide A real rarity this – a Pinot Gris that is a white wine with the look of a rosé on account of extended skin contact, another innovative and beautiful wine from California’s Jolie-Laide. So smooth, fresh and rounded in the mouth with delicious fruit flavours and a perfect balance – early picking of the fruit has retained acidity and helped keep kept alcohol down to a delightfully light 12% The unique colour is such a feature of this wine – coral pink mixed with light brown and saffron highlights; the nose is rosé-style fruity with red berries, Earl Grey tea, watermelon and stone fruit; the palate has structure and a ripe tannic presence but it also bathes the mouth with gorgeous watermelon, orange peel, cherry flavours. A really special and individual wine – highly recommended.
    • Hugely impressive new 2020 vintage of this 100% Greco di Tufo from Campania favourite Feudi di San Gregorio – from first sight of the stylish bottle through to the lingering dry finish. The aromatics are gorgeously vinous and perfumed – it sounds obvious but it has that really distinctive Italian white wine bouquet – almond blossom, mandarin, lemon oil, wild fennel. On the palate it is refreshing, medium bodied, fine texture with lively acidity and mineral detail, saline, pear, peach and green plum. The finish is dry, encouraging further tasting. Pure, complex and very moreish. The winemaking is straightforward with cool fermentation in steel tamks followed by 5-6 months on lees.
    • The new Grand Vintage Rosé is a serious, grown-up Extra Brut Rosé Champagne that seems to be aimed at lovers of Pinot Noir just as much as those of Champagne and Rosé. To look at the wine is deep salmon pink with saffron highlights; fine steady bead; there’s a wild, woodland berry intenseness on the nose, with the Pinot Noir making its elbows felt, even showing some sous bois, a hint of spice, Sechuan pepper perhaps. The palate is firm, structured, ripe tannins, still with a texture that gives it all sorts of gastronomic potential. Like the white Grand Vintage it finishes on grapefruit, pink in this case, with some pith thrown in for good measure.
    • Finca Viladellops is situated 45km from Barcelona on the Garraf Massif, a mountainous region that extends to the Mediterranean. There are 60 hectares of organically-farmed vines on a 400 hectare estate, 250m above sea level on very poor soil. The winery only uses indigenous grapes – Garnaxta for the reds and Xarel.lo for the whites. This splendid white is 100% Xarel.lo (a grape best known for making Cava) and is made from a selection of the estate’s oldest vineyards, which includes 30% rosé Xarel.lo, an almost extinct variety. The wine has been aged for a year and is structured, fresh, complex and balanced – a real eye-opener. Golden straw to look at, you find aromas of lemon oil, almond blossom, ripe Williams pear in a complex bouquet; the palate is fresh, bracing, with an attractive grapefruit-sour edge, and a tightly-wound mineral finish. Lots of detail here. Worked well as an
    • Fascinating full-bodied white blend from St Chinian in the Languedoc - a real Vin de meditation. Vermentino, Grenache Blanc, Viognier and Roussanne - fermented in new wood, lees-aged. On the eye: Golden yellow, seemingly aged/evolved beyond its four years of age; ripe, honeyed; the palate is rounded, lush, but reined in by mineral, acidity and touch of salty citrus. The wood is well integrated adding body, colour and richness. Works well without food but scallop carpaccio would be a good match. Cool label too - reminds me of the one on SA’s Porseleinberg.
    • Always a reliable and versatile wine that punches well above its weight. It’s fruit-forward and has plenty of red fruit concentration (morello) cherries, spice, wood sap, and a ripe, slightly confected grenadine syrup note; it’s the palate that delivers most, mainly due to a rock solid base of acidity and blue-plum-skin tartness that pulls it all together and balances it well. At 13.5% this allows the coastal Maule to shine through is good as a quaffer or food-pairing wine. Great value at £15.
    • Being hailed by winemaker Corinne Seely as the apotheosis of Exton Park’s expression of Chardonnay from the 60-acre estate in the Hampshire valley of Meon, this is an unique blend of 45 reserve wines chosen from the estate’s 10 year library. Unlike Champagne NV which uses one vintage as a base for the bulk of the wine, RB45 is a true multi-vintage blend that isn’t based on the latest vintage. After the vigorous mousse dies down, the wine has a steady, fine bead, medium shiny gold with a green hue; the nose has golden, honeyed autumn orchard fruit, an inviting ripeness, blossom honey, apple blossom, some complexity with hints of leesy patisierre notes, some nuts, grilled pain perdu, a hint of wood, all lurking in the background. The attack on the palate is fresh, invigorating, balanced and brim full of flavour. It has tension, bright acidity but a delightful textural
    • ‘Flagship’ wines from Bristol-based Xisto, which sails the wines across from Portugal under sail with a zero waste mandate. A blend of Touriga Franca, Touriga Nacional, Tinta Barroca, Tinta Amarela and Tinto Roriz, and made by Mateus Nicolau de Almeida – biodynamic, hand harvested, foot trodden with indigenous yeast, and aged for eight months in concrete. It’s part of a project that looks at the difference altitude makes in the Duoro valley, this being the highest (400m). The wine itself has concentrated black fruit, structured, but fresh and well balanced at the same time, nicely textured. The Torna Viagem version has been sea-aged for one year, a process which seems to have developed it far more than the one year difference suggests, also bringing out earthier elements in the wine.
    • Luminous pale copper-amber with saffron highlights; hugely complex nose as you might expect, real solera touch, dried peach, fennel, liquorice, mango. Medium to full bodied, finely textured mouthfeel, broad, rich, complex and with a ripeness (it feels like a high rs) that keeps the wine so well balanced and juicy in the mouth without the ‘blotting paper’ dryness you can get with some orange wines. Just delicious. 13.5% 2016 vintage. One of the pioneers of the modern Greek wine revolution Gaia Estate was established in 1994 by Greek winemakers Leon Karatsalos and Yiannis Paraskevopoulos. Operating two different wineries they make wines in both Nemea and Santorini.
    • A standout from the recent Bristol Independent Importers’ first tasting – a biodynamic Aligoté made exclusively by Sylvain Pataille for Déja Bu Wines. The wine comes from 45 year-old vines in Marsannay-La-Côte and then spends 12 months in French foudres. The 2019 and the 2020 were on show, the ’19 having yellow stone fruit and citrus notes, the ’20 having more breadth and complexity, starting with a smash of fresh citrus and having a mineral and textured mouthfeel on the long finish. Both wines light and easy drinking and seriously good value at £13 a pop. (TD)
    • Vacheron has been certified biodynamic since 2005, cousins Jean-Laurent and Jean-Dominique Vacheron take a Burgundian approach to their winemaking, picking and vinifying by specific parcel. This is their entry level white: Pale yellow with green hue; the nose is complex with a real sense of breeding, the white fruit and gooseberry that is there is nicely matched with a grassy, smoky quality, the faintest hint of gunflint; on the palate the wine is fresh, elegant and classy, medium bodied with an assured balance, power coming from a real backbone of minerality. Good grip on the long finish. Ridiculously good for this estate’s entry level - really how I like my Sauvignon Blanc.