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    Bart Feys
    People: Producer
    Brasserie du Quercorb

    Brasserie du Quercorb: making craft beer in the heart of wine country

    Inspired by an episode of A Place in the Sun, Jayne and Paul Bayliss decided to jack in their media jobs in the UK and head to the Languedoc where they set up a craft beer brewery in the heart of wine country… not knowing a thing about making beer. Brasserie du Quercorb is almost 10 years old and has reached capacity – supplying the French on-trade with a range of award-winning ales, through their on-site brasserie and also off sales. Peter Dean met up with them just as they opened a new brewery that will triple production and see them able to supply a range of new export markets – including the UK.

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    Opinion
    rosa-andre

    How South Africa’s Old Vine Project is saving lost vines for the future

    South Africa might, in comparison to other wine producing countries, be a relatively newcomer on the international wine market, but it has vines that date back decades. But they are in ever decreasing numbers as they are have been systematically ripped out over the years to be replaced by new vines as producers and the major co-ops look to keep ahead of world demand by planting more global varieties than local ones. But now thanks to the Old Vine Project and the pioneering work of respected viticulturist, Rosa Kruger, more and more older vines are being protected, saved and brought back to life. Vines that potentially give winemakers the opportunity to produce styles of wine that are the true identity of South Africa and have learnt how to live through at least 35 years – the age at which they are deemed to be ‘old’ – and become part of the Old Vine Project. Richard Siddle explores what the project means in reality, and how it is still a slow, but very important process in convincing growers and the major co-operatives to identify where the old vines are and help bring them back to life.

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    Opinion
    Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh

    Exploring the joys of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh at the Barriques d’Or auction

    ‘Plaimont Producteurs and the Sale of the Golden Barrels’ sounds like a story JK Rowling could have dreamt up, beret pulled down over her eyes after necking a bottle of solid Madiran in the rolling hills of Gascogne. It is, however, an annual auction held on November 5th where the finest barrels of Pacherenc du Vic-Bilh (or Barriques d’Or) are sold to the on-trade – a chance to assess the latest harvest, get first dibs on the best of the best, and also to come together and celebrate as one winemaking community – just before the grapes are picked for the next vintage. Peter Dean travelled there to take part in the festivities and on no account to come home with 228 litres of sticky.

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    Insight
    Sommeliers had the chance to taste in their own time a wide range of Hungarian wines

    Buyer Sommelier Workshop: debate & taste Hungarian wines in 90 minutes

    There must be times as a leading sommelier that you are as much in demand as all the latest movie stars sitting on Graham Norton’s sofa. Be it in the restaurant and the time needed to work behind the scenes to have the right wines for customers to buy, and then the time to get out, taste, discover and find new things to list. Which is why The Buyer’s new Sommelier Workshop concept is designed to give sommeliers an insight into a key emerging country in 90 minutes. Which is what we would look to deliver with our journey into the wines of Hungary and what varieties, styles and price points are right for premium UK restaurants.

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    People People: Supplier
    ross-sleet

    Rascallion: why blended wines are the stars of South Africa

    South Africa is winning plaudits left, right and centre for the quality of its wines, from reds, to whites, to sparkling and anything in between. But for Ross Sleet and the new Rascallion wine brand it is the country’s blended wines that are truly world class. It’s why the Rascallion wine range has been created using only blends, using both traditional combinations and more left field option from across South Africa. Richard Siddle went on a road trip with him to track down the right ‘ingredients’ for his next blends.

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    Tasting: Wine
    Saint-Péray

    Why Saint-Péray is the under-the-radar gem of North Rhône

    On a recent tasting visit of the Saint-Péray AOC in the Rhône, Bart Feys is excited by the quality of the current crop of white wines and their potential to develop into complex ageworthy wines. Recent years have also seen the resurgence of sparkling Saint-Péray, a unique wine with a long history. With a string of recent successful vintages, now seems the ideal time to explore this little forgotten corner of the Northern Rhône.

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    People People: Producer
    bock-2

    Why the best is yet to come from Hungary’s Bock winery

    The Bock winery from Villany in Hungary has many stories to tell, none more so than how, like so many Hungarian hard-working families, it has prospered in the wake of the Communist regime.  It all started when the Bock family, with only half a hectare of vines, was able to kickstart and restore viticulture to the Villany region. Today the Bock winery has expanded to 80 hectares and its wines are known across the country. Its next challenge is to build its profile and reputation overseas at trade and consumer tastings and hopefully on restaurant wine lists. 

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    People People: Supplier
    Here's what to expect in Peter Stafford-Bow's second book, Brut Force

    Who does the fictional author Peter Stafford-Bow think he is?

    The world of wine is full of conundrums. Just how do you define natural wine? What exactly is minerality, why do Americans love Yellow Tail so much and just who is Peter Stafford-Bow? Yes, this mysterious figure suddenly appeared out of nowhere with a top selling book, Corkscrew, detailing the apparently fictitious, yet also so very accurate, lives of supermarket wine buyers and the producers and distributors that supply them. He is now back with his second book, Brut Force, that picks up the adventures of his hero Felix Hart. The Buyer managed to track him down – admittedly via email and not face to face – to try and reveal just a little more about who the real Peter Stafford-Bow really is.

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    People People: Producer
    Dönnhoff

    Helmut Dönnhoff on finding the natural ‘talent in the vineyard’

    The wines of Dönnhoff hold a special place in the hearts and minds of great wine lovers worldwide. This 20-hectare estate in Germany’s Nahe wine region has been making wine since the mid-18th century but it wasn’t until 1971 when Helmut Dönnhoff took over the helm that the winery took on superstar status thanks to Helmut’s commitment to quality and skill as a winemaker. With Helmut now passing much of the day-to-day running of the estate to his son Cornelius, Helmut spent a warm summer’s evening with Christina Rasmussen to explain why he thinks ‘higher’ can be good with global warming, how the rise of dry Riesling is a sommelier-driven thing and why every vineyard has a special ‘natural talent.’ The winemaker’s job is to harness it.

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    Insight
    The Boutinot mantra...

    Boutinot: Why working with the right restaurants is key to success

    You would think with so much competition for every single possible space on restaurant, pub and bar wine lists that a national drinks distributor can’t afford to turn down any business that might come its way. Particularly in the current climate where wine lists are being squeezed, and margins raised as the mainstream and premium on-trade looks to find any way possible to use its wine and drinks list to help offset the rising business, wage and food costs that have hit the sector so hard over the last few years. But for Boutinot the key to its success is having the discipline to say no to any potential business that it feels is not in its long term interest. Which, as it increasingly spreads its net away from its northern stronghold and, in particular, into London and the south east becomes harder by the month. Richard Siddle talks to Kevin Pollard, who heads up Boutinot’s growing London office, about the challenges it faces, but also the huge opportunities it still has to build its profile, presence and influence in wider areas of the UK’s premium on-trade scene.

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